Photo Archive: Jack Ruby

Photo Archive: Jack Ruby


In this famous picture of Oswald outside the Texas Theater, they altered the image of his t-shirt. They have it way up on his neck. It was nothing like that. It doesn't even look like a t-shirt. It looks more like a polo shirt.


Photos: Menands through the years

8 of 81 Albany-Rensselaer Bridge Conference in Albany. Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt, Joseph J. Murphy, Senator William T. Byrne, James D. Flemming, Assemblyman M. F. Breen, Senator John F. Williams, Menands Mayor J. A. Scott, Troy Mayor Burns, Rev. Samuel W. Speer, Mayor Thacher, Arthur J. Burch and C. A. Ferguson were present. Taken April 15, 1931. (Times Union Archive) Show More Show Less

10 of 81 The Montgomery Ward department store's children's department in Menands, 1938. Find something really disturbing in the photo. (Times Union Archives) Show More Show Less

11 of 81 Buy Photo Village offices, Menands, New York. October 22, 1988 (John Carl D'Annibale/Times Union Archive) John Carl D'Annibale/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

13 of 81 Buy Photo Marine Midland Bank robbery investigation - Broadway, Menands, New York - pix looking north. November 27, 1979 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

14 of 81 Buy Photo Pickets at Mohawk- Hudson River Humane Society, Menands, New York - Amalgamated Clothing & Textile Workers Union. November 15, 1979 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

16 of 81 Buy Photo New York - Demonstrating that Christmas isn't the exclusive property of the youngsters, Robert Yaun, 93, left, and Aubry Darby, 95, help trim the tree at the Home for Aged Men in Menands, assisted by Mrs. George Duffy who is co-director with her husband of the home. December 24, 1964 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

17 of 81 Buy Photo Dianne Marlowe appearing nightley at The Persian Room in Menands, New York. She is the vocalist of The Gene James Trio. Undated (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

Memorial Hospital Auxiliary, Albany, New York - Mrs. Stephen Scullen Jr. of Loudonville and Mrs. Herman Mendel of Westmere. Standing: Mrs. Edgar Duninng of Loudonville, Hospital Chairman, and Mrs. Rita Santer, Menands Program Chairman. October 1969 (Times Union Archive)

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20 of 81 After Ambrose Carr of Menands returned from World War I service, he sat down to watch a film at The Grand in Albany when he saw an advertising slide from the Marine Corps that featured him. (Times Union Archive/State Archives) Show More Show Less

Trying on the headgear they'll be wearing in Albany's St. Patrick's Day Parade are these leaders of the newly formed St. Patrick's Club of Menands which is organizing that village's parade contingent: from left, William P. Khachadoorian, a committee member James P. O'Brien, parade marshal for Menands Division, and Richard I. Bauer, treasurer. Undated (Times Union Archive)

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23 of 81 Buy Photo Cumberland Farms on Broadway in Menands, New York - gasoline bomb through through store window. May 11, 1984 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

25 of 81 Buy Photo Albany International Corp. headquarters off Menands Road, Menands, New York - Robert H. Sloan, president and chief executive officer James H. Peak, Vice President of Human Resources and member of Parsons Board of Directors Lyn Pauquette, Development Director at Parson Child and Family Services. December 23, 1981 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

26 of 81 Buy Photo Lula Lee King & grandson Yahahn Thompson outside their Menands, New York home at 49 Maguier Street. September 19, 1980 (Skip Dickstein/Times Union Archive) Skip Dickstein/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

28 of 81 Buy Photo Archie Pietrzyk, Menands Market, New York. June 04, 1980 (Skip Dickstein/Times Union Archive) Skip Dickstein/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

29 of 81 Buy Photo Menands, New York - bike path - bikeways - looking south, near Montgomery Wards. April 20, 1980 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

31 of 81 Buy Photo Troy, New York - Siena College Project Giving - Mike Quigley of Menands, Tony Bruno of Kingston, Mark Albin, and Carol Cervane. November 28, 1972 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

32 of 81 Buy Photo Groundbreaking ceremony for Jerry Lewis Cinema at the Mid-City Shopping Center in Menands, New York. Left to right: James A Amendala, Alberto P Cariso, Jack Davis, John F Faris and Francis R Kaerig. October 03, 1972 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

34 of 81 Buy Photo Albany, New York - Doane House in Menands, residence of the Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of Albany. September 04, 1971 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

35 of 81 Buy Photo Young girl holds her first puppy at Mohawk and Hudson River Humane Society, Menands, New York. May 26, 1963 (Bernie Kolenberg/Times Union Archive) Bernie Kolenberg/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

37 of 81 Buy Photo Dr. William Burgess Cornell, Menands, New York. August 03, 1938 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

38 of 81 Buy Photo Dr. William Burgess Cornell examines dog in Menands, New York. August 03, 1938 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

40 of 81 Buy Photo Dr. William Burgess Cornell walking dog in Menands, New York. August 03, 1938 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

41 of 81 Buy Photo Menands, New York Animal Shelter - Ed Joy, Superintendent, with stray female Collie, approximately 4 months old. They are refurbishing the whole shelter - these are new cages in background. Undated (Bob Wilder/Times Union Archive) Bob Wilder/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

43 of 81 Buy Photo Dogs and people attend the ribbon cutting ceremony at the Mohawk and Hudson Humane Society, Menands, New York. left to right: W. Stanley Nabers, Mrs Margaret D Silverman, John F Farner, Jr, Edward V Joy and R. Ross Davis. May 1970 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

44 of 81 Buy Photo Tru Value Hardware, Broadway, Menands, New York - Tony Esposito, manager, sets one of his trees up straight in his lot of Christmas trees Monday morning. December 05, 1994 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

46 of 81 Buy Photo Norm Brickman with boxes of produce at Menands Market, New York. August 15, 1994 (Skip Dickstein/Times Union Archive) Skip Dickstein/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

47 of 81 Buy Photo Ellie Kittle & Kathy Lanni at Regalo's in Menands, New York. June 30, 1994 (Skip Dickstein/Times Union Archive) Skip Dickstein/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

49 of 81 Buy Photo Stacey & Saul Kimmel playing lacrosse in Menands, New York - for father's day bit. June 13, 1994 (Jack Madigan/Times Union Archive) Jack Madigan/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

50 of 81 Buy Photo Scotia Schools. UPS delivering driver Mark Bachand of Menands, New York, with students from Sacandaga Elementary School and packages of school supplies they collected and are sending to Hurricane Andrew victims. Bachand was among a team of UPS men that collected packages Monday afternoon. UPS is sending the supplies for free. March 01, 1993 (John Carl D'Annibale/Times Union Archive) John Carl D'Annibale/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

52 of 81 Buy Photo Boxes of natural foods sold at Natural Brands, Menands, New York, purveyors of natural environmental conscious products. October 15, 1992 (Luanne Ferris/Times Union Archive) Luanne Ferris/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

53 of 81 Buy Photo Dr. Patricia O'Gorman speaks to Menands, New York educators during Superintendent's conference at Menands School. November 06, 1990 (Arnold LeFevre/Times Union Archive) Arnold LeFevre/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

55 of 81 Buy Photo Menands, New York - Mini Imagination Celebration workshop at the Menands School - Kristen Stangle, 7 years, and Karen Long, 7 years, doing their cutouts for the poster. March 21, 1990 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

56 of 81 Buy Photo Menands, New York - Project coordinator Donna DiNovo, left, and materials coordinator Kathy Coon demonstrate some of the difficulties imposed on their playground construction by recent weather conditions. Both are parents of kids at Menands School. October 19, 1989 (John Carl D'Annibale/Times Union Archive) John Carl D'Annibale/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

58 of 81 Buy Photo Fire-damaged Cumberland Farms building in Menands, New York - firebombed. May 12, 1989 (Jack Madigan/Times Union Archive) Jack Madigan/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

59 of 81 Buy Photo Village election at fire department in Menands, New York - moments after polls had opened, registered voters sign their name to vote at inspector's table. There are four voting districts in village of Menands. Approximately 2,300 can vote. March 18, 1987 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

61 of 81 Buy Photo Dog Catcher Peter McKenzie displays an English Bulldog named "Churchill" outside his Animal Shelter Van at the Menands, New York shelter. December 26, 1986 (Fred McKinney/Times Union Archive) Fred McKinney/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

62 of 81 Buy Photo Menands Workshop, Menands, New York - Jerry F. Kruegler of Clifton Park, President of American Converting Paper Co., with William S. Norton of Ballston Lake, Executive Director of Menands Workshop. July 17, 1985 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

64 of 81 Buy Photo Tom Geer repairs riding lawn mower at Montgomery Ward Service Center in Menands, New York. May 10, 1984 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

65 of 81 Buy Photo Martin Knapp, tech supervisor, and Gene Weaver, manager, talk outside in front of a van for the Montgomery Ward Service Center in Menands, New York. May 10, 1984 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

67 of 81 Buy Photo Exterior view of the Montgomery Ward's store in Menands, New York. December 26, 1983 (Fred McKinney/Times Union Archive) Fred McKinney/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

68 of 81 Buy Photo Paul Quakenbush, attendant, holds "Blaze" a 6 month old Beagle mixed male at the Mohawk and Hudson Humane Society, Menands, New York. November 28, 1980 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

70 of 81 Buy Photo Paul Quakenbush, humane agent, holds a 6 week old Shepard Mixed female which is up for adoption at the Mohawk and Hudson Humane Society, Menands, New York. October 22, 1980 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

71 of 81 Buy Photo Marine Midland Bank on Broadway in Menands, New York - scene of holdup. November 20, 1979 (Jack Pinto/Times Union Archive) Jack Pinto/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

73 of 81 Buy Photo Mohawk- Hudson River Humane Society, Menands, New York - 6 week old kittens at shelter. November 28, 1973 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

74 of 81 Buy Photo Albany, New York - Doane House in Menands, residence of the Episcopal Bishop of the Diocese of Albany. September 04, 1971 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

76 of 81 Buy Photo Montgomery Ward officials look over report in Menands, New York - Vincent R. Burns, Store Manager, with Merchandise Managers John H. Gooch and Sid Gallant. September 28, 1964 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

77 of 81 Buy Photo New York - Accepting the gavel as the new president of Menands Rotary Club is Michael Golash, left. Taking part in the presentation, from left, are: Kenneth MacAffer Jr., retiring president Duncan MacAffer, first vice president and Joseph E. Riggs Jr., elected treasurer for a ninth term look on. July 08, 1964 (Knickerbocker News Staff Photo/Times Union Archive) Knickerbocker News Staff Photo/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

79 of 81 Buy Photo New York - Vincent R. Burns, retail store manager at Montgomery Ward and Co., Menands, pins a rose on Mona Smith, newly appointed Wendy Ward, at a luncheon to announce the store's charm school for teenagers. Looking on is Miss Isabella D. Arden, personnel manager at the Menands store. Mrs. Smith has just returned from a training session at Montgomery Ward's national headquarters in Chicago. October 16, 1963 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

80 of 81 Buy Photo Gary Frosell hands kitten to Kim Mousseau, age 5, at Mohawk & Hudson River Humane Society in Menands, New York. May 26, 1963 (Bernie Kolenberg/Times Union Archive) Bernie Kolenberg/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

Times Union columnist Chris Churchill recently looked back at the history of Menands, the village where he lives.

"Enough of the old Menands remains to make it an unusual and distinct place, a village worth caring about and knowing," Churchill wrote."

"Broadway is still the village's commercial strip. You may know it for the old Montgomery Ward building, a towering landmark, now an office complex, visible from the Dunn Memorial Bridge. You may also know Broadway for Mohawk Hudson Humane Society, St. Agnes Cemetery and the Capital District Farmers Market, which is primarily for wholesalers."

Churchill also looked ahead, noting how many families have lived in the village for generation and also how the community has welcomed newcomers of diverse backgrounds.


Photos: Lake George through the years

5 of 99 A copy photo of an artist's drawing of the Lake House in the early 1800s in Shepard Park on Lake George in the town of Caldwell, N.Y., which would later be changed to Lake George. PAUL BUCKOWSKI/HEARST Show More Show Less

7 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George, New York - These graceful wide-eyed marionettes are sure traffic-stoppers at Storytown, USA in Lake George, NY. Known as the Trotter Brothers Marionettes, these lovely ladies are part of an extensive marionette family who will return to Storytown for its Silver Anniversary year. May 19, 1978 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

8 of 99 Print of the town of Caldwell, now known as Lake George. WILL WALDRON/ALBANY TIMES UNION Show More Show Less

New York State promotional photo of people waterskiing on Lake George, 1950s. Lake George N.Y. (Times Union archive)

11 of 99 W.H. Bartlett print--The town of Caldwell, now known as Lake George. The Lake George image is circa 1840, after Caldwell's death, but the best image of his home and property. WILL WALDRON/ALBANY TIMES UNION Show More Show Less

13 of 99 Photo of Zieback Pharmacy in Lake George, NY in 1927. Times Union archive Show More Show Less

14 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George Village, New York - rides at Gaslight Village are snow covered during winter months. January 28, 1984 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr. Show More Show Less

16 of 99 Buy Photo New York - Miss Nancy Kulik was selected Queen of the Adirondack Festival of Music and Arts at Diamond Point, Lake George. Miss Kulik, an opera singer, is a graduate of Albany High School and Syracuse University where she majored in voice. She attended Hunter College last year where she studied voice under a special scholarship. July 10, 1961 (Times Union Staff Photo/Times Union Archive) Times Union Staff Photo/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

17 of 99 Buy Photo Harry E. P. Meislahn, Headmaster, Albany Academy, New York picks up sails on dock at Lake George Club. August 08, 1959 (Roberta Smith/Times Union Archive) Roberta Smith/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

19 of 99 Buy Photo Canoeists on Lake George near Bolton Landing in New York, Green Island at right. June 30, 1949 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

20 of 99 Buy Photo Performers on stage at Gaslight Village, Lake George, New York. August 16, 1973 (Richard K. Dean/Times Union Archive) Richard K. Dean/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

22 of 99 View of Lake George Village from the 1930s in Lake George N.Y. (Times Union archive) Times Union archive Show More Show Less

23 of 99 Canoe Island Lodge on Lake George Aug. 1952, in Lake George N.Y. Historic 1950s. (Times Union archive) Times Union archive Show More Show Less

25 of 99 Buy Photo New York - Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute - Fresh Water Institute - lowering sample bottle into Lake George. March 26, 1972 (Paul D. Kniskern Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

Lake George, New York - Lion tamer Harriet Beatty, daughter of famed Clyde Beatty, gives one of the beasts she works with a cooling drink during a record breaking wave in the Adirondack Mountains during the Labor Day weekend. Miss Beatty is appearing at "Storytown, USA," located at this resort village. September 02, 1969 (Times Union Archive)

Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

28 of 99 Buy Photo Gaslight Village, Lake George, New York recreates the atmosphere of the Gay Nineties. July 11, 1965 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

29 of 99 Buy Photo Dean Rippon, Alligator Wrestler, Animal Land, Lake George, New York. August 16, 1964 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

31 of 99 Buy Photo New York - Michigan's Fred Andreae zooms to the finish line the winner in D division of the 9th annual Stock Outdoor Marathon run at hague, Lake George, Sunday. Andreae had best time, finishing the 90 mile marathon in two hours, 18 minutes, 45 seconds. Other winners were Tullio Celano, Elmsford, NY, 36 cubic Ron Althouse, Reading, PA, A division John Martenson, Michigan, B division, and Chris White, Michigan, C division. August 19, 1963 (Walter Grishkot/Times Union Archive) Walter Grishkot/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

32 of 99 In this copy of a photo By Walter Grishkot, an unidentified woman jokes around with 'George,' the Lake George monster, in 1971 aboard the M/S Victoria on a cruise back from St. Thomas in the Virgin Islands. The wooden monster had been purchased in the early 1960s by a woman who took the monster with her to the Virgin Islands. A mock trial played out in 2001 where the Village of Lake George went against the Town of Hague for custody of 'George'. The wooden monster was created by Harry Watrous back in the early 1900s as a practical joke on a friend. PAUL BUCKOWSKI/DG Show More Show Less

34 of 99 A copy photo of Harry Watrous, who created 'George' the Lake George wooden monster back in the early 1900s as a practical joke on a friend. PAUL BUCKOWSKI/DG Show More Show Less

35 of 99 Buy Photo Rod Bucklin completes scale model of Lake George monster in New York. December 16, 1962 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

37 of 99 Buy Photo Tom Jacobs on cross country racing training skis called "roller skis" at Prospect Mountain, Lake George Village, New York. Jacobs, of Glens Falls, is a 1952 US Olympic Nordic Ski Team competitor. October 22, 1976 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

38 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George Opera Festival, New York - Costumer Sharon Lewis with Catherine Brock. July 18, 1976 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

40 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George, New York - Canada Street. August 14, 1974 (Bud Hewig/Times Union Archive) Bud Hewig/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

41 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George, New York - Mexican Hat in mini-golf course. August 14, 1979 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

43 of 99 Buy Photo Price Manor on Bolton Road in Lake George, New York - home of the notorious Colonel Walter W. Price. February 07, 1979 (Seneca Ray Stoddard/Times Union Archive) Seneca Ray Stoddard/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

44 of 99 Buy Photo Stock car race on ice, Lake George Winter Carnival, New York. February 04, 1979 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

46 of 99 Buy Photo Swimmers interviewed on shore of Lake George, New York - Mary Homkey, Chris Irvine, Dan Blank, and Mike Huntington. August 25, 1978 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

47 of 99 Buy Photo Long Island, Lake George, New York - ducks - Pat Stock of Albany feeds the mama and her two children as they cruise around the camping island. August 05, 1978 (Bud Hewig/Times Union Archive) Bud Hewig/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

49 of 99 Buy Photo Horse drawn buggy in Lake George Beach State Park, New York. July 15, 1991 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

50 of 99 Buy Photo American Legion, Lake George, New York - Joe McCarthy, winner of Stormin' Norman (Gen. Norman Schwarzkopf) lookalike contest. June 29, 1991 (John R. Dillon/Times Union Archive) John R. Dillon/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

52 of 99 Buy Photo Camp Chingachgook, Pilot Knob Road, Lake George, New York - BOCES Undated (Board of Cooperative Education Services) students from Johnstown along with their instructors work on a couple of cabins at the YMCA camp. May 10, 1988 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

53 of 99 Buy Photo Great Escape Theme Park, Lake George, New York - Mr. and Mrs. John Post, Heather Schlachter, Mr. and Mrs. David Carey take the first tide on the Raging River amusement ride - Raging River Gala 1st Annual. August 12, 1986 (Jack Madigan/Times Union Archive) Jack Madigan/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

55 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George Winter Carnival, New York - Canoe jostling is one of the weekly events features at the carnival. February 05, 1984 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

56 of 99 Buy Photo Tom Woods sails along Lake George, New York on sailboard. August 08, 1983 (Fred McKinney/Times Union Archive) Fred McKinney/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

58 of 99 Buy Photo Pedestrians walk along sidewalk in Lake George, New York. September 08, 1981 (Raymond B. Summers/Times Union Archive) Raymond B. Summers/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

59 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George, New York - Lone man leans against parking meter along empty Lake George Street, Thursday. September 16, 1994 (Steve Jacobs/Times Union Archive) Steve Jacobs/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

61 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George, New York - Warrensburg Central School students, parents, and members of the Lake George Association get off the Ethan Allen after a ride on Lake George as part of the YMCA Floating Classroom Project. May 25, 1993 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

62 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George, New York - Shellie Thompson, Michael Fuelleman Undated (behind her) and Tom Jarrett, a vice president of the Lake George Association use a black and white disc on a rope to check for water quality or the clearness of the water as they lowered it in the water to depths measured by markings on the rope. May 25, 1993 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

64 of 99 Buy Photo Bicyclists on path in Lake George, New York. August 06, 1992 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

65 of 99 Buy Photo Lake George, New York - YMCA Program Director Kenis Sweet, right, sits outside the new Rotary Lodge building Undated (background) before the dedication ceremony Sunday at Camp Chingachgook. June 14, 1992 (Steve Jacobs/Times Union Archive) Steve Jacobs/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

67 of 99 Buy Photo New York - Lake George Park Commission fleet. July 07, 1962 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

68 of 99 Buy Photo New York State Attorney General Louis Lefkowitz with mule at Lake George, Storytown USA. August 1970 (Ed Lewi/Times Union Archive) Ed Lewi Show More Show Less

70 of 99 Buy Photo Paratrooper amusement ride, Gaslight Village, Lake George, New York - a new $27,000 fun ride has been added to Gaslight Village, a Gay Nineties family fun park in Lake George. Undated (Times Union Archive) Show More Show Less

71 of 99 Buy Photo Cast on stage at Gaslight Village in Lake George, New York. Undated (Times Union Archive) Show More Show Less

73 of 99 Times Union file photo of Storytown in Lake George, NY on August 23, 1955. Storytown is now The Great Escape. FILE PHOTO/DG Show More Show Less

74 of 99 Swimmer Diane Struble, mother of 3, is ready to swim 32 miles from Ticonderoga to Lake George Village on Aug. 22, 1958. Show More Show Less

76 of 99 Diane Struble pauses with the Warren County Sheriff's Department patrol boat crew before starting on her attempt to swim from Ticonderoga to Lake George Village, 32 miles away on Aug. 22, 1958 Show More Show Less

77 of 99 Swimmer Diane Struble, mother of 3, is ready to swim from Ticonderoga to Lake George Village on Aug. 22, 1958. Show More Show Less

79 of 99 Swimmer Diane Struble takes grapes from Kip Navaretta after about the first hour in Lake George. Aug. 22, 1958. Show More Show Less

80 of 99 File photo by Richard K. Dean -- Diane Struble swimming. While some 200 boats followed swimmer Diane Struble on her 35 hour journey from Ticonderoga to Lake George (Aug. 22-23, 1958), some 10,000 people lined the shores of the lake to cheer her on. Warren County Sheriff Carl K. McCoy said that was "the largest crowd we ever had in the village." Show More Show Less

82 of 99 Photo from circa 1965 copied on Thursday , June 19, 2003, in Lake George Village, N.Y. The photo shows the original excavation site when either the foundation or the pool was being dug at the Holly Tree Inn. Originally the site of a battle cemetery during the Seven Year War, 24 skeletons were found when the original foundation was dug, and now more are being found as the inn is undergoing an expansion project. DG Show More Show Less

83 of 99 Buy Photo Gaslight Village, Lake George, New York recreates the atmosphere of the Gay Nineties. July 11, 1965 (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

85 of 99 Buy Photo New York - Lake George Winter Carnival Queen Sandy (last name unavailable) shoots a practice round in December 1965 on the nine-hole par 27 course on Lake George. Queen Sandy will reign over the 8th Annual Winter Carnival commencing February 1 and 2, 1966. Her caddy is H. Daniel Bush, president of the Lake George Chamber of Commerce. The carnival will feature outdoor winter sports throughout the month of February. (Times Union Archive) Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

86 of 99 Buy Photo New York - Lake George Winter Carnival Queen is crowned by Congressman Edward W. Pattison 29th District Saturday evening January 25 at Form William Henry Motel, Lake George - Queen: Joyce Anne Trumble of Lake George, age 18 Congressman Edward W. Pattison, Democrat 29th District "Georgie" the Snoman, Republican. January 27, 1975 (Walt Grishkot/Times Union Archive) Walt Grishkot/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

88 of 99 Buy Photo 4 wheel drive drag race held on ice on Lake George, New York during Winter Carnival. February 16, 1976 (Bob Richey/Times Union Archive) Bob Richey/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

89 of 99 Buy Photo Ticonderoga & Minne-Ha-Ha cruise ships at Lake George, New York. August 14, 1979 (Bud Hewig/Times Union Archive) Bud Hewig/Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

91 of 99 Buy Photo Snowmobilers gather for races and pleasure on Lake George in New York. January 28, 1984 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

92 of 99 Buy Photo Stock car race on ice, Lake George Winter Carnival, New York. February 04, 1979 (Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Archive) Paul D. Kniskern, Sr./Times Union Historic Images Show More Show Less

94 of 99 Times Union staff photo Paul D. Kniskern, Sr. -- Winter Carnival at Lake George, NY in 1979. PAUL D. KNISKERN, SR./DG Show More Show Less

95 of 99 The 115-foot-long cruise ship "Adirondac" is slowly transported through Ticonderoga, N.Y., Wednesday, May 12, 2004, from Lake Champlain on a special truck enroute to Lake George, N.Y. The ship will be assembled at Lake George village, where it will become the second ship in the fleet of Shoreline Cruises. LOHR MCKINSTRY/AP Show More Show Less

97 of 99 Times Union staff photo by Paul Buckowski --- Lake George Mayor Robert Blais looks over the former site of Gaslight Village in Lake George, N.Y. on Tuesday, Oct. 25, 2005. The site also housed Action Park for a few years after the Gaslight closed. Blais is a big proponent of the West Brook Watershed Protection Project which would turn the area where the Gaslight buildings stand back into a wetland to better filter storm water runoff. Paul Buckowski/Hearst Show More Show Less

98 of 99 Times Union staff photo by Paul Buckowski --- A view looking down on Six Flags Great Escape Lodge and Indoor Waterpark being built on Wednesday, Nov. 9, 2005 in Lake George, N.Y. Paul Buckowski/Hearst Show More Show Less

Lake George, the "Queen of American Lakes," has been welcoming tourists a century and a half.

Click through the slideshow to see photos from the Times Union archive of Lake George through the years.

In the 19th century, William H. H. Murray, a preacher from Boston who loved fishing, hunting and camping, introduced the Adirondacks as a vacation spot according to visitlakegeorge.com.

Murray published a book called "Adventures in the Wilderness or, Camp-Life in the Adirondacks" in 1868. It was half travel guide, half short-story collection and filled with articles about enjoying and surviving life in the mountains.

The lake has been a four-season attraction, from the Polar Plunge and Winter Carnival early in the year to lake cruises and annual special events such as the Elvis Festival and Americade motorcycle rally.

Tourism officials constantly work to diversify the offerings, said Ed Bartholomew, who heads the Warren County Economic Development Corp. Tourists spend $1.4 billion a year on their visits to the region, supporting thousands of jobs.

New this year are several attractions, including the Lake George Expedition Park featuring animatronic dinosaurs and the Hurricane Harbor water adventure at Six Flags' Great Escape in Queensbury.

Dino Roar Valley is located in the former Magic Forest attraction, which first opened in 1963. The Magic Forest remains, and the entire attraction is now known as the Lake George Expedition Park

Six Flags' Splashwater Kingdom in Queensbury became Hurricane Harbor and features a 14,000-square-foot expansion called Monsoon Lagoon, with the Bucket Blaster interactive ride that offers water guns, as well as Shipwreck Cove, a pool featuring water sprays and geysers.

The park's new name is Six Flags Great Escape and Hurricane Harbor.

The Morgan, a replica of a 19th century tourist vessel, already offers 90-minute Lake George cruises to guests of the Sagamore Resort in Bolton Landing, a feature included in their resort fee.


Photo Archive: Jack Ruby - History

A multitalented blind black musician, Ray Charles pioneered soul music, which became enormously popular among both black and white audiences beginning in the late '50s. In secularizing certain aspects of gospel music (chord changes, song structures, call and response techniques, and vocal screams, wails, and moans) and adding blues based lyrics, he virtually invented a new genre of music.

Born in 1930, Ray Charles (nee Ray Charles Robinson) in Albany, Georgia grew up in Greenville, Florida. At age six he started to lose his sight from glaucoma after traumatically watching watching his brother drown in the wash tub his mother used for take-in laundry. At the age of seven, from 1937 to 1945 he attended the St. Augustine School for the Deaf and Blind, where he learned piano, and later clarinet and alto saxophone, compose for big bands, as well as learning to read and write music in Braille. Orphaned at fifteen, Charles struck out on his own performing in bands around Florida. In 1948 at the age of seventeen Charles took his $600 savings and moved to Seattle. There he formed the Maxim trio, a group grounded in the style of Nat "King" Cole and Charles Brown. The Maxim Trio had a major R&B hit in 1949 with "Confession Blues" on the Downbeat (later Swing Time) label. It was during this time that he first began using Heroin. Charles toured with blues artist Lowell Fulson in the early '50s, having R&B hits with "Baby Let Me Hold Your Hand" and "Kiss Me Baby" on the small Los Angeles based Swingtime Label.

In 1952 Atlantic Records purchased Charles's recording contract from Swingtime for $2500. Charles give up the Nat "King" Cole stylization and began adapting gospel music techniques to blues lyrics. He soon had a hit with "It Should Have Been Me." In 1954 he arranged and played piano on Guitar Slim's top R&B hit "The Things I Used to Do" for Specialty Records and formed his own band. In 1955 Charles had a hit in both the R&B and pop fields with his own composition "I've Got a Woman." Using top flight studio musicians Charles had hits consistently on the R&B charts through the late '50s with "A Fool for You," "Drown In My Own Tears," :Hallelujah I Love Her So," and "Lonely Avenue," The recording debut of his female backup group the Raelettes. He also became popular with jazz fans, recording two highly acclaimed records and performing a set at the 1958 Newport Jazz festival in 1959. Charles established himself as a popular recording artist and a pioneer of soul music with the release of his own top R&B/pop hit composition "What I Say."


Signing with ABC-Paramount 1959
Photo courtesy Michael Ochs Archives

Sensing that Atlantic was still basically an R&B organization, Charles moved to ABC-Paramount Records in late 1959. Through 1961, he had top pop hits with "Georgia On My Mind," "Hit the Road Jack," "Ruby," and "Unchain My Heart."He also recorded Genius + Soul = Jazz for Impulse (ABC's jazz subsidiary label), yielding a near smash pop/ top R&B hit with the instrumental "One Mint Julep," This album and one recorded with Betty Carter for ABC-Paramount brought him increasing popularity with jazz fans, black and white.

In 1962 Charles formed Ray Charles Enterprises, comprised of Tangerine Records, Tangerine Music, and Racer Music Company, opening studios and offices in Los Angeles in 1963. By then he was using forty piece orchestras and full vocal choruses for his recordings. With his full commercial sound, his Modern Sounds in Country and Western became phenomenally popular producing crossover smashes with "I Can't Stop Loving You," "Born to Lose," and "You Don't Know Me." Within a year volume two was released and had crossover hits "You Are My Sunshine," "Your Cheating Heart," and "Take These Chains From My Heart." On ABC Charles had major pop hits with "Busted," "That Lucky Old Sun," "Crying Time," and "Together Again."

During the 60s Charles became involved in films, appearing in the 1962 film Swinging Along, and the 1966 British film Ballad in Blue, and recording the soundtracks for The Cincinnati Kid (1965) and In the Heat of the Night (1967). By this time he was performing on the nightclub circuit, touring with his own package revue from 1969 into the '70s.

In 1973 Charles left ABC Records, retaining the rights to his ABC material and transferring his Tangerine operation to the new label Crossover. During 1976 he recorded Porgy and Bess with Cleo Laine for RCA Records. In 1977 he returned to Atlantic, moving to Columbia in the '80s and Warner Brothers in the '90s. In 1978 Dial Press published his autobiography and in 1980 appeared in The Blues Brothers movie and scored a minor country hit for his duet with Clint Eastwood, "Beers to You, from the film Any Which Way You Can. Charles had a major country hit with "Born To Love Me" in 1982 and later recorded duets with country stars on Friendship. The album yielded five country hits, including "We Didn't See a Thing" (with George Jones), "Seven Spanish Angels"( with Willie Nelson) and "Two Cats Like Us" (with Hank Williams JR,). Charles also played a major role in the recording of USA for Africa's "We Are the World" single in 1985.

1n 1989 Charles had his first major pop hit in over twenty years with with "I'll Be Good to You," featuring himself and Chaka Khan. In the '90s Charles appeared in commercials for Pepsi and was the subject of a PBS documentary.


RPM International Building
Courtesy Michael Lyndon

Ray Charles continues to work about eight months a year, touring with a large orchestra. He lives in Los Angeles where he is involved with RPM International, a corporation that includes Crossover Records, the music publishing companies Tangerine and Racer Music, and RPM Studios, where he records. In 1990 Charles began recording for Warner Brothers, recording in 1993 My World with Eric Clapton, Billy Preston, Mavis Staples, and June Porter.

Charles was inducted into the Blues Foundation's Hall of Fame in 1982.
Charles was also inducted into the Rock and Roll's Hall of Fame in its inaugural year 1986.


Jack Nethercutt's 1952 Oldsmobile

1952 Oldsmobile Holiday 98 restyled by Barris Kustoms for Jack Nethercutt of Santa Monica, California. Jack bought the Oldsmobile in 1953. He was 16 years old at the time, and he drove his brand new Oldsmobile straight from the Oldsmobile dealer to Barris Kustoms. ΐ] At Barris Kustoms the top was chopped and a new molded grille opening was made out of exhaust tubing. The gravel pan was molded in and the front bumper guards were sectioned and fit with 1953 Mercury bumper bullets. A floating bar from a 1953 Ford was installed between the modified bumper guards. The hood was shaved and peaked and the headlights were frenched. Custom made parking lights were integrated below the headlight rims. The car was shaved for door handles and deck lid ornamentation and the doors were push-button operated. The side trim was a combination of 1953 Dodge and 1953 Ford side trim. Jack had George and the guys install custom fender skirts on the car. Functional scoops were fabricated in front of the fender skirts. The stock taillights were kept, but they were frenched into the extended rear fenders. Twin Cadillac antennas were installed on the rear fenders. The exhaust was routed through square slots in the rear bumper and backup lights were integrated into the bumper guards. Jack also had Barris install dual spotlights. Once the bodywork was done, Jack's Olds was painted copper with a gold roof. The car got its power from a gold plated 1953 Cadillac engine. Because of its extensive use of gold plating, Jack's Olds was often referred to as the "Goldsmobile" although it's real name was "Vienesse". Among the guys at Barris Kustoms working on the car was George Barris, John Manok and Frank Sonzogni. Α]


Jack's car was later mangled in the right rear quarter, so he had to bring it back to Barris Kustoms to have it repaired. Α] In 1960 the Vienesse was featured in Customs Illustrated September 1960, by then it was owned by Ronnie Smith of El Cajon, California. According to the story, fins, beaks and scallops were not Ron's thing, as he was into the smooth, traditional styling of yesteryear. The same story stated that the top had been chopped 4 inches. It also claimed that the bumperettes were from a 1952 Lincoln and that the rear fenders had been extended 1 1/2 inches. Β]


The Jack Lord Only His Secretary Knew

Marie and Jack Lord remained close to Margaret Doversola (right) throughout their lives. PHOTO COURTESY MARGARET DOVERSOLA ARCHIVES

It was all about the music, serious acting, his hair and that dramatic Waikiki wave that opened every Hawaii Five-0 episode, which paralleled Jack Lord’s bangs perfectly draped over his forehead. From 1968 to 1980, he dominated our living rooms as the star of the long-running CBS TV series.

Today, reruns continue to be beamed worldwide. Toward the end of the series, Jack Lord “was” Steve McGarrett both on and off screen — a well-kept secret that the actor’s secretary, Margaret Doversola, has been keeping for nearly 35 years.

“On the day we filmed Hawaii Five-0‘s final episode, Wo Fat was sitting in his jail cell, he twisted the heel of his shoe, pulled out a lock pick with his eyes glinting, as if hinting he would not be locked up for long. Jack turned to me with excitement, he grinned from ear to ear, his eyes lit up and his voice pitch rose, ‘Margaret, go get a photographer. We got Wo Fat and we’re making history!”

At that very moment, she realized actor Jack Lord had morphed into Lt. Steve McGarrett.

“It was as if there was no difference any longer,” explains Doversola.

The star’s loyal friend remained close to the elusive actor, who chose to live out his golden years with wife Marie watching daily sunrises and sunsets from their Kahala condo. They made Hawaii their home purposely to stay far away from the paparazzi, and glitz and glamour of Hollywood — Hawaiian style.

Jack and Marie frequented Longs Drugs and the old Star Market in Kahala, but what most people don’t know is that

Doversola, who ended up becoming one of Hawaii’s revered movie-casting directors, frequented Lord’s condominium and continued to work for the couple even after her Hawaii Five-0 paychecks stopped. She was Marie’s lunch mate and often brought brown rice to their home from health food stores.

“Marie was into healthy living way before it was a trend, and Jack always had funny stories to tell,” she recalls.

The most memorable was when he was a merchant marine looking to buy a home in upstate New York. He came across an old house with character. Jack knocked on the door and a sophisticated French lady by the name of Marie De Nard answered. She was a strikingly elegant dress designer, some eight years his senior. De Nard invited him in, and in the course of Jack trying to convince the homeowner that she should sell him the house, they got to be more than good friends and ended up tying the knot.

“Call it destiny. Jack always seemed to get what he wanted one way or another, but when he swept Marie off her feet, he got more than he bargained for — both the house and the girl,” chuckles Doversola.

Jack Lord drew, painted and created jewelry. Doversola treasures one of his original prints that hangs in her living room. She also keeps dear to her heart one of the actor’s signature 1970s McGarrett shirts and his official Hawaii Five-0 badge, which the tough cop carried with him when he said his signature line, “Book ’em, Danno!”

Doversola portrays Jack as down to earth, one who had a strong work ethic and was loyal to management.

“He knew that he couldn’t go out painting his superiors badly in public, yet he did have strong differences with creator/producer Leonard Freeman. He was making decisions on the set and changing the script, which did not go down well with Freeman and caused major friction between them,” she recalls.

He appreciated women who behaved like ladies and had a tough time with females who had foul mouths. During the 11th season, an actress who played a female detective on Hawaii Five-0displayed “unladylike behavior” on the set.

“He called her into the producer’s office and gave the actress a real tongue lashing about the way she carried herself. Loud verbal punches were exchanged. When the door opened, Jack smiled as if nothing happened, winked at me and asked, ‘Margaret, may I have a cup of coffee?’ He was a classy role model but he didn’t appreciate people not taking their jobs seriously.”

My family are still faithful Five-0 fans, and once in a great while when we unwind to watch the original show, we catch our thrills to see my brother Nephi’s episodes on reruns. Hearing the Hawaii Five-0 theme music brings back a flood of memories of the ’60s and ’70s that were created in the Hannemann household. I was hooked as a teenager, and when I turned on the TV, homesickness was alleviated during my dorm days at Harvard. It wasn’t YouTube, but it sure made me feel closer to home watching the local landscape from across the miles on the tube, even when I was a Fulbright scholar in New Zealand. It was a big deal seeing the likes of Zulu, Al Harrington, Doug Mossman and Jimmy Borges on the big screen because I also enjoyed them as entertainers in Waikiki.

Jack Lord’s morning ritual was clipping local newspaper stories to include in his scripts. During the last five seasons of the series, Doversola spent time in his trailer typing script changes and helping him with his personal secretarial duties. It is only fitting that she would have imprinted in her memory the very last scene she would have with Jack, playing the part of a close friend.

“Marie invited me in. He was sitting in his living room wearing his favorite weathered, gray tennis shoes, which he often wore trekking across the streets of Kahala as an avid runner. He looked up at me, his eyes lit up once again — but this time, Alzheimer’s had taken over his body and his ability to speak. It was the saddest moment of my life,” she says.

He died from congestive heart failure at age 88 in 1998 in Honolulu. Doversola was there for him and Marie. She was one of a dozen friends present during the scattering of Jack’s ashes from a two-man canoe in the waters off the Lords’ Kahala condo. In the end, Jack was no longer the debonair, commanding authority he once played on television, but his devoted friend, Doversola, is convinced that, to Lord, Hawaii was truly the star of the show, and the actors were just simply telling the stories that emanated from the Islands of Aloha.


50 Years Ago: The World in 1963

A half century ago, much of the news in the United States was dominated by the actions of civil rights activists and those who opposed them. Our role in Vietnam was steadily growing, along with the costs of that involvement. It was the year Beatlemania began, and the year President John F. Kennedy visited West Berlin and delivered his famous "Ich bin ein Berliner" speech. Push-button telephones were introduced, 1st class postage cost 5 cents, and the population of the world was 3.2 billion, less than half of what it is today. The final months of 1963 were punctuated by one of the most tragic events in American history, the assassination of President Kennedy in Dallas, Texas. Let me take you 50 years into the past now, for a look at the world as it was in 1963.

Civil rights leader Reverend Martin Luther King, Jr. waves to supporters on the Mall in Washington, District of Columbia, during the "March on Washington," on August 28, 1963. King said the march was "the greatest demonstration of freedom in the history of the United States." #

A Helmeted U.S. Helicopter Crewchief watches ground movements of Vietnamese troops from above during a strike against Viet Cong Guerrillas in the Mekong Delta Area, on January 2, 1963. The communist Viet Cong claimed victory in the continuing struggle in Vietnam after they shot down five U.S. helicopters. An American officer was killed and three other American servicemen were injured in the action. By 1963, nearly 16,000 American military personnel were deployed in South Vietnam. #

French Singer Yves Montand performs at a fund-raising evening of entertainment in Washington, District of Columbia, to celebrate the second anniversary of President John F. Kennedy's inauguration, on January 18, 1963. #

Ronny Howard, center, who plays Opie on "The Andy Griffith Show," is joined by his real-life father Rance Howard and little brother Clint in an episode of the show, marking the first time that all three Howards had worked in a TV show together, in 1963. #

A motorist's view of a street in Baghdad, Iraq, on February 12, 1963, where tanks stand by to prevent further outbreaks of fighting which followed a military coup and overthrow of Premier Abdel Karim Kassem's five-year-old regime by elements of the Ba'ath Party. #

The use of small, portable TV sets in the U.S. had not quite caught on in 1963, but in Japan, where they were first developed, viewers were hooked on the miniaturized video machine. Owners of the sets, such as this patient in a Tokyo hospital, took them with them wherever they went. #

Napalm air strikes raise clouds of smoke into gray monsoon skies as houseboats glide down the Perfume River toward Hue in Vietnam, on February 28, 1963, where the battle for control of the old Imperial City has ended with a Communist defeat. Firebombs were directed against a village on the outskirts of Hue. #

Sixty five drivers run for their cars at start of International 12-hour endurance race at Sebring, Florida, on March 23, 1963. #

President John F. Kennedy and First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy ride in a parade in Washington, District of Columbia, on March 27, 1963. #

Powered sledges break a trail through Maine's primitive Allagash Forest, on March 5, 1963. Twenty men, led by an expert on Arctic equipment, made an extended trip through the forest to test equipment. Robert Faylor, director of the Arctic Institute of North America, led the group. The sledges, called Polaris vehicles, are powered with engines about the size of an outboard motor and travel up to 8 or 10 miles an hour, depending on snow conditions. #

After the eruption of Mount Agung in Bali, on March 26, 1963, most of the cabins have been destroyed in this village. On March 17, the volcano erupted, sending debris into the air and generating massive pyroclastic flows. These flows devastated numerous villages, killing approximately 1,500 people. #

Diane Sawyer, 17, America's Junior Miss of 1963, takes a few snapshots of New York's skyline on March 18, 1963. #

Admiral Richard Byrd's "Little America III" station, built in Antarctic in 1940, was spotted by a Navy icebreaker sticking out of the side of this floating iceberg in the Antarctic's Ross Sea, on March 13, 1963. The old outpost was buried beneath 25 feet of snow, 300 miles away from its original location. A helicopter pilot flew in close and reported cans and supplies still stacked neatly on shelves. #

Riders read their morning newspapers on New York's subway en route to work, on April 1, 1963 after the end of the city's 114-day newspaper strike. #

Black college student Dorothy Bell, 19, of Birmingham, Alabama, waits at a downtown Birmingham lunch counter for service that never came, April 4, 1963. She was later arrested with 20 others in sit-in attempts. #

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, left, and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., are removed by a policeman as they led a line of demonstrators into the business section of Birmingham, Alabama, on April 12, 1963. #

Bluebird, the 5,000 horsepower car in which Donald Campbell hopes to break the world land speed record, pictured during its first run, with Campbell at the controls, during preliminary tests on the specially prepared track at Lake Eyre, South Australia on May 2, 1963. Torrential rains flooded the lake, postponing his run until the following year, when he set a record of 403.10 mph (648.73 km/h). #

The launch of the Mercury Atlas 9 rocket with astronaut Gordon Cooper on board from Launch Pad 14 at Cape Canaveral, Florida, on May 5, 1963. Mercury Atlas 9 was the final manned space mission of the U.S. Mercury program, successfully completing 22 Earth orbits before splashing down in the Pacific Ocean. #

A 17-year-old civil rights demonstrator, defying an anti-parade ordinance in Birmingham, Alabama, is attacked by a police dog on May 3, 1963. On the afternoon of May 4, 1963, during a meeting at the White House with members of a political group, President Kennedy discussed this photo, which had appeared on the front page of that day's New York Times. #

A young black woman, soaked by a fireman's hose as an anti-segregation march is broken up by police, in Birmingham, Alabama, on May 8, 1963. In the background is a police riot wagon. #

French explorer and oceanographer Jacques-Yves Cousteau near his "diving saucer" during an undersea exploration in the Red Sea, in June of 1963. Together with Jean Mollard, he created the SP-350, a two-man submarine that could reach a depth of 350 m below the ocean's surface. #

A cheering crowd, estimated by police at more than a quarter of a million, fills the area beneath the podium at West Berlin's City Hall, where U.S. President John F. Kennedy stands. His address to the City Hall crowd was one of the highlights of his career. #

A picketer in front of a Gadsden, Alabama, drugstore turns to answer a heckler during a demonstration, on June 10, 1963. About two dozen black youths picketed several stores and two theaters. There were no arrests and no violence. #

26-year-old Valentina Tereshkova, who became the first woman to travel in space, as seen in a television transmission from her spacecraft, Vostok 6, on June 16, 1963. #

Attorney General Robert Kennedy uses a bullhorn to address black demonstrators at the Justice Department, on June 14, 1963. The demonstrators marched to the White House, then to the District Building, and wound up at the Justice Department. #

Thich Quang Duc, a Buddhist monk, burns himself to death on a Saigon street to protest alleged persecution of Buddhists by the South Vietnamese government, on June 11, 1963. #

Alabama's governor George Wallace (left) faces General Henry Graham, in Tuscaloosa, at the University of Alabama, on June 12, 1963. Wallace blocked the enrollment of two African-American students, Vivian Malone and James Hood. Despite an order of the federal court, Governor George Wallace appointed himself the temporary University registrar and stood in the doorway of the administration building to prevent the students from registering. In response, President Kennedy federalized the Alabama National Guard. One hundred guardsman escorted the students to campus and their commander, General Henry Graham, ordered George Wallace to "step aside." Thus were the students registered. Kennedy addressed the public in a June 11 speech that cleared his position on civil rights. The bill that he submitted to Congress was ultimately passed as the Civil Rights Act of 1964. #

Mourners file past the open casket of slain civil rights activist Medgar Evers in Jackson, Mississippi, on June 15, 1963. On June 12, Evers was shot and killed outside his home by by Byron De La Beckwith, a member of the White Citizens' Council. #

Dr. Michael Debakey installs an artificial pump to assist a patient's damaged heart in Houston, on July 19, 1963. #

Allison Turaj, 25, of Washington, District of Columbia, blood running down her cheek, was cut over her right eye by a thrown rock in a mass demonstration at a privately owned, segregated amusement park in suburban Woodlawn in Baltimore, on July 7, 1963. #

Robert Fahsenfeldt, owner of a segregated lunchroom in the racially tense Eastern Shore community of Cambridge, Maryland, douses a white integrationist with water, on July 8, 1963. The integrationist, Edward Dickerson, was among three white and eight African American protesters who knelt on the sidewalk in front of the restaurant to sing freedom songs. A raw egg, which Fahsenfeldt had broken over Dickerson's head moments earlier, still is visible on the back of Dickerson's head. The protesters were later arrested. #

Firefighters turn their hoses full force on civil rights demonstrators in Birmingham, Alabama, on July 15, 1963. #

Mrs. Gloria Richardson, head of the Cambridge Nonviolent Action Committee, pushes a National Guardsman's bayonet aside as she moves among a crowd of African Americans to convince them to disperse, in Cambridge, Maryland, on July 21, 1963. #

Chicago police move in to knock down a burning cross in front of a home, after an African-American family moved into a previously all white neighborhood, on the 6th consecutive night of disturbances, on August 3, 1963. #

The statue of Abraham Lincoln is illuminated during a civil rights rally, on August 28, 1963 in Washington, District of Columbia, #

Folk singers Joan Baez and Bob Dylan perform during a civil rights rally on August 28, 1963 in Washington D.C. #

White students in Birmingham, Alabama, drag an African American effigy past West End High School, on September 12, 1963. Two African American girls attended the desegregated school and a majority of the white students were staying away from classes. Police stopped this car in a segregationist caravan in front of the school to caution them about fast driving and blowing auto horns in front of a school. #

A civil defense worker and firemen walk through debris from an explosion which struck the 16th street Baptist Church, killing four girls and injuring 22 others, in Birmingham, Alabama, on September 15, 1963. The open doorway at right is where the girls are believed to have died. The horrific attack rallied public support to the cause of civil rights. Four men, members a Ku Klux Klan group, were responsible for planting a box of dynamite under the steps of the church. Three of the four were eventually tried and convicted. #

One trooper sprawls in the flooded swamp as other Vietnamese Government Soldiers walk through the water after landing from U.S. army Helicopters near CA Mau Peninsula in South Vietnam on September 15, 1963. The Soldiers were landed to pursue communist Viet Cong Guerrillas who had attacked a Vietnamese outpost. #

A young Swedish fan hugs George Harrison as The Beatles play at a pop festival in Stockholm, Sweden, on October 26, 1963. Paul McCartney, left, sings with Harrison. #

President John F. Kennedy greets a crowd at a political rally in Fort Worth, Texas in this November 22, 1963 photo by White House photographer Cecil Stoughton. #

At 12:30 pm, just seconds after President John F. Kennedy and Texas Governor John Connally were shot in Dallas, Texas, the limousine carrying mortally wounded president races toward the hospital, on November 22, 1963. With secret service agent Clinton Hill riding on the back of the car, Mrs. John Connally, wife of the Texas governor, bends over her wounded husband, and Mrs. Kennedy leans over the president. #

Lee Harvey Oswald sits in police custody shortly after being arrested for the assassination President John F. Kennedy, and the murder of Dallas police officer J. D. Tippit, in Dallas, Texas, on November 22, 1963. #

Flanked by Jacqueline Kennedy (right) and his wife Lady Bird Johnson (2nd left), U.S Vice President Lyndon Johnson is administered the oath of office by Federal Judge Sarah Hughes, as he assumed the presidency of the United States, on November 22, 1963, following the assassination of President John F. Kennedy in Dallas #

Lee Harvey Oswald, accused assassin of President John F. Kennedy, is placed on a stretcher after moments after being shot in the stomach in Dallas, Texas, on November 24, 1963. Nightclub owner Jack Ruby shot and killed Oswald as the prisoner was being transferred through the underground garage of Dallas police headquarters. #

Jackie Kennedy kisses the casket of her late husband, President John F. Kennedy while her daughter Caroline touches it in rotunda of U.S> Capitol, on November 24, 1963. #

With the illuminated U.S. Capitol in the background, mourners form an endless line which lasted through the night, to pay their respects to the slain President John F. Kennedy, in Washington, District of Columbia, on November 24, 1963. #

Three-year-old John F. Kennedy Jr. salutes his father's casket in Washington in this November 25, 1963 photo, three days after the president was assassinated in Dallas. Widow Jacqueline Kennedy, center, and daughter Caroline Kennedy are accompanied by the late president's brothers Senator Edward Kennedy, left, and Attorney General Robert Kennedy. #

Picture released on December 2, 1963 of the formation of Surtsey, a new volcanic island off the southern coast of Iceland forged from volcanic eruptions. #

New York's Verrazano-Narrows Bridge, linking Brooklyn to Staten Island, under construction, on December 4, 1963. The bridge, with a span of 4,260 feet, opened to traffic on November 21, 1964. #

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The Assassination Goes Hollywood!

W e generally expect Hollywood to take some liberties with facts. But what if Hollywood turns history upside down? Garrison's famous comment about the assassination was:

Ironically, that's the key to understanding the movie JFK. In scene after scene, the impression conveyed by the movie is at odds with the historical record — even at odds with what conspiracy buffs will admit is the record.

T he following is adapted from notes prepared by attorney Mark Zaid for a 1993 course on the Kennedy Assassination taught at Hudson Valley Community College, New York. The list has been supplemented by John McAdams, Eric Paddon, Russ Burr, and Patricia Lambert's book False Witness . It's a very partial account of ways in which Stone tampered with the historical record.

Scene Accuracy Stone's Agenda
Sinister Connections in New Orleans
Oswald and Guy Banister talking on street about Fair Play for Cuba postersPure speculation. Some less than credible witnesses have placed Oswald in Banister's officeTie Banister to Oswald
Shaw in background when Oswald is handing out FPCC postersPerson resembling Shaw does appear in WDSU-TV newsfilm, but it's not Shaw. Oswald was handing out flyers in front of the building in which Shaw worked.Tie Shaw to Oswald
Jack Martin's comments about Operation MONGOOSEEven if Martin was aware of U.S. government anti-Castro activity, it is highly unlikely he would have known the code-name. Increase Martin's credibility
Banister pistol whipped Jack Martin because of "strange things" Martin had been seeing around Banister's officeBeating was the result of argument over phone billsEstablish sensitive, sinister goings-on at Banister's office
Banister's office part of Dallas / New Orleans / Miami arms "supply line"A Garrison notion with no evidence to support itReinforce notion of Banister as sinister and dangerous character
Ferrie arrested at CIA training camp for Cuban refugeesNever happenedExaggerate Ferrie's ties with anti-Castro Cubans
Oswald at Lake Pontchartrain raidAbsolutely no supporting evidenceProvide links important for film plot
Shaw visiting Banister's officeAbsolutely no supporting evidenceTie Shaw to Banister
When story "breaks," Ferrie calls Lou Ivon and complains bitterly that "somebody tipped off the press" Ferrie himself went to the press, told reporters that Garrison considered him a suspectConceal forthright behavior on Ferrie's part, paint him as furtive
Building at 544 Camp with "both entrances going to the same place"Camp Street and Lafayette Street entrances went to different offices — Guy Banister's office could not be reached from 544 CampTie Oswald to Guy Banister
Oswald shown printing Fair Play for Cuba leafletsThey were printed at a New Orleans printerDramatic effect
Willie O'Keefe character (convict who knows Shaw and knows of assassination plot)Character is composite of 4 witnesses: Perry Russo, David Logan, Raymond Broshears and William Morris. All four witnesses had severe credibility problems, with Russo telling a story at the Shaw trial that contradicted his early statementsProvide a credible witness to Shaw, Oswald, and Ferrie plotting
French Quarter informant tells Garrison staffer that "everybody down here knows the guy [Clay Shaw as Clay Bertrand]"Garrison staffers combed the Quarter, failed to find any evidence of "Bertrand" and concluded he didn't existConceal Garrison's crackpot identification of Shaw as "Bertrand" — "they [homosexuals] always change their last names, but never their first names."
Shaw, being booked, admits to alias "Clay Bertrand"Officer claiming this was contradicted by other witnesses, and found non-credible by judge. Implausible that Shaw would admit to any such aliasVindicate Garrison's crackpot identification of Shaw as "Bertrand"
Garrison has Ferrie brought in for questioningFerrie knew Garrison was looking for him and came in with his attorneyMake Ferrie appear evasive
David Ferrie's "confession" in Fountainbleu HotelNever happened. Ferrie went to his death denying any knowledge of Oswald or the plot to kill JFKProvide "confession" from a plotter
Richard Helms later admitted that Shaw had "worked for" the CIA.Helms said no such thing. Shaw merely gave information to the Domestic Contract Service, like thousands of other American businessmen, journalists, and travelers.Claim that Garrison's notion of Shaw as CIA operative has been vindicated.
Sinister Happenings in Dealey Plaza
References to Hobo arrestsHobos have been identified they had no connection to the assassinationAdd to cast of sinister characters in Dealey Plaza
Hobos showed "not a single freyed collar . . . clean hands, new shoe leather"Hobos were dressed as you would expect tramps to beAdd to cast of "sinister" characters in Dealey Plaza
Bill Newman says shots came from "fence up on the Knoll"Bill and Gail Newman believed the shots came from directly behind them — the "mall" (Pergola), not the Stockade FencePush idea of Grassy Knoll shooter
Lou Ivon claims the "Zapruder film established three shots in 5.6 seconds"Film is perfectly consistent with three shots in eight to nine secondsPortray Oswald's shooting "feat" as impossible
In Warren Commission testimony, Lee Bowers says he saw a "flash of light" and "smoke."He mentioned neither to the Warren Commission. He later told conspiracy author Mark Lane that he saw "a flash of light or smoke or something which caused me to feel like something out of the ordinary had occurred . . . "Push notion of Grassy Knoll shooter
Epileptic had seizure in Dealey Plaza, and "vanished . . . never checking into the hospital."Man, named Jerry Belknap, left when he felt better, and could get no attention from hospital staff occupied with Kennedy and ConnallyImply conspiratorial "diversion" in Dealey Plaza in the minutes before the shooting
Garrison (Costner) asserts that 51 witnesses heard shots from the Grassy KnollNumber was far fewer. Even conspiracy author Josiah Thompson only claims 33 "Knoll" witnesses, and the House Select Committee only classified 20 witnesses as "Knoll" witnessesPush idea of Grassy Knoll shooter
Jean Hill tells agent "I saw a man shooting from over there behind that fence [on the Grassy Knoll]"Hill was saying no such thing in the 1960s, although she later began to make such claimsProvide "Grassy Knoll" witness
Jean Hill sequestered and intimidated shortly after the assassinationHill went with Mary Moorman and Don Featherston of the Dallas Times Herald to the press room of the Sheriff's OfficeCreate impression of "coverup" badgering witnesses
Beverly Oliver storyOliver was not known to Garrison or anyone else until years later. Elements of her story are extremely implausible.Tie Ruby to Oswald
Julia Ann Mercer sees Jack Ruby in pickup truck near Dealey Plaza on the morning of the assassination.Police officers who were with truck fail to confirm Mercer's story, which implies absurd scenario for getting weapon onto Grassy Knoll. Link Ruby to the assassination
Oswald, running down the stairs after the shooting, runs past Victoria Adams and Sandra Styles.Both women actually descended the stairs several minutes after Oswald.Argue that Oswald would have been seen had he retreated from the Sniper's Nest to the second floor lunchroom
Laying of new floor on sixth floor of Depository allowed "unknown workmen in the building"Flooring was done by Depository employees, and no "unknown workmen" were seen by Depository employeesEvade serious problem with Stone's scenario, the issue of who did fire the shots if Oswald didn't
Oswald as innocent victim
Garrison says Domingo Benevides "refused to identify" Oswald as shooterBenevides first said he didn't see the shooter well enough for an identification, but then later identified OswaldImply that Benevides believes the shooter to be someone besides Oswald
Garrison describes three cartridges lying "neatly side by side in Sniper's Nest"Cartridges were not neatly side by side, but scatteredImply plot to frame Oswald with planted evidence
Garrison claims Oswald was "interrogated for 12 hours and nobody made a record of it."Reports from each of Oswald's interrogators can be found in the Warren Commission Report Imply that law enforcement officers were engaged in a plot
Paraffin tests showed Oswald had not fired rifleSuch tests had no value as evidence, and were used mainly to intimidate suspectsPortray Oswald as innocent of shooting
Dallas cops "didn't bother to see whether the rifle had been fired that day"No test existed to determine whether a rifle had been recently firedImply avoidance of test that might prove Oswald innocent
Oswald, if guilty, would have had to make head shot at range of 88 yards, "through heavy foliage"At time of head shot, path between sniper's nest and limo was clearArgue that someone besides Oswald must have fired head shot
Garrison claims that Oswald's statements while in custody would be inadmissible in courtThey would in fact have been admissiblePortray Oswald a victim who didn't receive due process
Jack Ruby corrects Henry Wade's "Free Cuba Committee" commentEntire chorus of voices corrected WadeCreate impression that Ruby was assigned to tie Oswald to leftist group
Dozens of cops descended on Texas Theatre to arrest man for entering without paying admissionMan (Oswald) was suspected of murdering Officer J.D. TippitImply conspiracy had "set up" Oswald arrest
In melee at Texas Theatre, Oswald tries to sock Officer McDonald. Oswald drew his gun and tried to shoot McDonald Conceal Oswald's violent behavior
Oswald friend "Bill Williams" (Michael Paine) had "links through his family to the CIA"Paine had in-law who worked for the Agency for International DevelopmentPortray Oswald as surrounded by spooky people, assigned to "set him up"
Pushing the Idea of Intelligence Involvement
Mr. XBased on meeting with Richard Case Nagell, but "Mr. X" voices views of L. Fletcher Prouty, who did not meet Garrison until many years later. Prouty has expressed a wide variety of crackpot opinions.Supply grand scale political explanation for the assassination
"Mr. X," in New Zealand, noted stories about Oswald before Oswald was even charged.Oswald was officially charged after 11:00 pm. in the evening. He had been chief suspect for hours, giving opportunity to check his background in newspaper files.Imply sinister CIA "cover story" being disseminated.
112th Military Intelligence Group told to "stand down."The group in fact had some agents in Dallas to help protect the president.Imply sinister "security stripping" in Dallas
"Gen. Y," the boss of "Mr. X" is seen in photos of tramps in Dealey Plaza.Based on crackpot "identification" of figure in photo by L. Fletcher ProutySupport Prouty's theory that "Y" (Lansdale) masterminded the assassination
National Security Action Memorandum 263 was first step in total U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam.Document foresaw the withdrawal of only 1,000 advisors, and not even those if South Vietnamese failed to "take up the slack."Provide military motive for JFK's murder
Oswald defection tied to Powers' U-2 shootdownPowers did speculate that Oswald was involved, but had no evidence. Oswald lacked information that would have helped Soviets down planeImply intelligence ties for Oswald
In USSR, Oswald lived "high on the hog" and the "only explanation for the royal treatment was that he gave the Russians secrets"Defectors had considerable propaganda value, and the government wanted them to be happyPush notion of Oswald as spook
Marina's uncle was with "Soviet Intelligence"He was head of the Timber Administration of the Belorussian Republic's Ministry of Internal Affairs.Imply intelligence connections for Oswald
Oswald spoke Russian so well Marina thought he was a native speakerHe spoke with a heavy accent, and she thought he was from one of the Baltic Republics, where Russian was not the native languagePush notion of intelligence training in Russian language
Marina "has no problems" getting out of U.S.S.R.Marina and Lee endured an extensive bureaucratic hassle to get Marina out of the countryImply some sinister intelligence connections
Lafayette Square was a "strange place for a communist to spend his spare time"Lafayette Square was a block from Oswald's place of workImply intelligence connections for Oswald
Oswald and Bringuier in "local TV debate"Debate was public affairs show on WDSU radioInflate importance of debate, which supposedly served to discredit the Fair Play for Cuba Committee
Dallas Mayor Cabell, brother of CIA's General Cabell, changed the motorcade route.Never happened. Route was announced only days prior to Nov. 22, 1963. The Secret Service and Connolly's staff planned the parade route with the intention of direct access to the Trade Mart.Imply sinister CIA manipulation
Lyndon Johnson tells military advisors "I'll give you your damn war"Quote, from Stanley Karnow's book Vietnam: A History , is ripped out of context and misinterpreted.Downplay extent to which war grew out of Kennedy's policies
Telex to all FBI offices warns of assassination attempt in DallasOnly one less-than-credible witness claims to have seen telex. No copies exist, and no corroborating witnesses.Argue that Oswald was an FBI informant, whose reports must have been the basis of the phantom "telex."
"Mr. X" claims that entire DC phone system was out for an hour following the assassinationSystem was overloaded, but most calls went throughImply high-level plot
Strange and "Convenient" Deaths
Jada's "disappearance" one week after she linked Oswald and Ruby ** Jada (Janet Conforto) never linked Ruby and Oswald. Rather than "disappearing" she died in a motorcycle accident in 1980, eleven years after Shaw was acquittedImply conspiracy "Cleanup Squad" killing witnesses
Death of Lee Bowers ("strange shock")No evidence of foul play occurred two years after Warren Commission testimonyImply "Cleanup Squad" of plotters killing witnesses
Goons murder David Ferrie by forcing pills down his throatFerrie died of Berry Aneurysm, with no evidence of violenceImply that Ferrie was "silenced."
Garrison, His Family, and Staff
Lou Ivon quits teamNever happenedDramatic effect
Parkland doctors testify at trialNever happenedAllows Stone to push conspiracy view of medical evidence
Garrison cross-examining Dr. FinckNever happened. Al Oser cross-examined FinckExaggerate Garrison's involvement in trial
Garrison watching Clay Shaw's testimonyNever happened. Garrison was not in courtroom when Shaw testifiedExaggerate Garrison's involvement in trial
Garrison and family view Oswald press conference in early/mid-eveningThe press conference was actually after 11:00 p.m.Portray Garrison as family man, moving events to "family" times
Garrison first questions Shaw on Easter Sunday, leaving family stranded in restaurantGarrison first questioned Shaw in December, 1966Dramatize "family" conflict over Garrison's investigation, Garrison's commitment to probe
Garrison becomes interested in assassination by watching TVGarrison became involved only when Jack Martin came forward with story linking Oswald and Ferrie"Personalize" Garrison interest in case
Garrison asks coroner about effect of drug Proloid on day Ferrie is discovered dead"Proloid" theory of Ferrie's death was suggested to Garrison six months after Ferrie's death.Inflate Garrison's investigative prowess, conceal extent to which he was dependent on suggestions from buffs
Garrison has copy of Italian newspaper, accusing Shaw of CIA connections, on the day he first questions himStory in disreputable Italian Communist paper came out after Shaw was arrestedImply that Garrison had solid basis for his suspicions about Shaw
Prior to Robert Kennedy's shooting, Garrison declares, "If he wins, they'll kill him. He wants to avenge his brother. He wants to stop that war." ** Garrison claimed that Robert Kennedy was "without any question of a doubt . . . interfering with the investigation of the murder of his brother" and was making "a real effort to stop it."Link JFK and RFK murders appeal to viewers who idolize Kennedy family.
Garrison's office buggedA Garrison claim entirely without any evidence to support itPortray Garrison as target of campaign by the Federal Government
Female Assistant District Attorney working on caseNo female attorney on Shaw prosecution teamAppeal to politically correct 1990s sensibilities about gender issues
Garrison in court when verdict read, walks out with wife and sonGarrison was in his office, not in the courtroom, and he flew into a rage when aides brought the news Push "Garrison as family man" image
Implying a Continuing Official Coverup
Johnson orders limo "filled with bullet holes" refurbishedThe only bullet strikes were to windshield and chrome topping. These are in the National Archives.Implicate Johnson in coverup
End credits declaring the Justice Department had "done nothing" with regard to the House Select Committee conclusions on "probable conspiracy."Justice Department took action by asking the Ramsey Panel to investigate the one piece of evidence used by the HSCA to declare a "conspiracy," the dictabelt recording, and they ruled that the evidence was invalid in 1982. Imply "continuing coverup:" conceal debunking of HSCA "finding."
Hosty note described assassination plotContradicts all witness testimony, vastly implausible that Oswald would pass on such important information in so casual a wayImplicate FBI in plot
Particularly significant, these Show Conscious Dishonesty in Dealing with the Evidence
Jackie pulls JFK down in limo, allowing Sniper's Nest shooter to hit ConnallyJackie did no such thingContradict Single Bullet Theory (but inadvertently supports Single Bullet trajectory)
Ruby introduces "my friend Lee Oswald" to Beverly OliverOliver claimed Ruby introduced her to "Lee Oswald of the CIA"Conceal absurd element in Oliver's story
Stone shows cloud of smoke from gun of Grassy Knoll shooterStone could find no gun that emitted that much smoke, had special effects man blow smoke from bellowsPush idea of Grassy Knoll shooter
** - In shooting script, not in final cut of movie.

Fair Play for Cuba: Hollywood Versus the Reality

How sinister was knowledge of Oswald and the Fair Play for Cuba Committee? In reality, news of Oswald's membership in this organization had been broadcast before 4:00 pm. Central time, and had been all over the media for almost eight hours at the time of Wade's press conference.


Photo Archive: Jack Ruby - History


Section Lunch Dec 2016 Top Row: Steven Cai, Sheila Brady, Monika Stojek, Andrew Demidowich, Rachel Branham, Viraj Parikh, Poojah Patel, Andrew Uhlman, Siena Romano, Jack Yanovski. Bottom Row: Miranda Broadney, Faizah Shareef, Anne Claire Grammer, Sarah Mi, Rim Mehari


Section on Growth and Obesity lab party, July 2016


Section Member Dezmond Taylor-Douglas (third from left) successfully defended his dissertation and was awarded his PhD with Honors in Physiology in April 2016


Section Member Ovidiu Galescu won the Human Growth Foundation’s Best Abstract Award in both 2015 and 2016


Section on Growth and Obesity lab party, June 2015


Dr. Yanovski (center) received the 2014 NIH Director’s Ruth L. Kirschstein Mentoring Award


Section on Growth and Obesity lab party, May 2014


Section on Growth and Obesity lab lunch, December 2013


Section on Growth and Obesity lab meeting, September 2012


Section on Growth and Obesity Lab Party, June 2009


The Section on Growth and Obesity was awarded NIH Clinical Center Bench to Bedside Awards in 2008 and 2009 for projects involving genetic factors involved in regulating food intake.


Section on Growth and Obesity lab meeting, February 2009


Section on Growth and Obesity lab meeting, March 2008


Using Air Displacement Plethysmography for body composition analysis, 2008


Pediatric Endocrine fellow Joan Han, MD with mentor Jack A. Yanovski, MD, PhD. Dr. Han was awarded The Obesity Society’s 2007 Ethan Sims Young Investigator Award.


Section on Growth and Obesity Lab Party, June 2007


Section on Growth and Obesity Lab Meeting, May 2006


Section on Growth and Obesity Lab Party, June 2005


Section on Growth and Obesity Lab Party, June 2004


Section on Growth and Obesity Lab Party, June 2003